Join a community of people who care about making work and life fit together. Learn how you, your employees, managers, and business can benefit from the custom-fit workplace. Sign-up and we'll send you updates about news, resources, articles, blogs, and events.

Sign Up

 

blogging on high-commitment workplaces

Lean In to What, Exactly?

Not to flatter myself, but I am exactly who Sheryl Sandberg had in mind when she decided to write Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. Thirty-five, married, mother of two young (but not too young) children, MBA who has worked consistently in one high-status industry for over a decade, and who is grappling with the next steps in her career. I’ve even got her name. And I am completely ready and willing to take in Sandberg’s advice, because I know I’m on the precipice of something. Maybe something big.

I’m a year or two away from my next promotion at the investment firm where I’ve worked since 2005. Our product is growing, I believe in it, and the opportunities arrive at a relentless pace. I’m in the office for dedicated hours four days a week, altered to meet the needs of my family, and work from home the fifth day. Working with international clients, I am generally available to respond to emails and join the occasional conference call at off hours, so that more time isn’t lost to time zone differences. I’m a highly organized and efficient employee, and I work hard.

As Women, We Are Our Own Best Source of Inspiration

For many of us moms, success is too often defined and driven by outside factors and interpretations of what and how we “should” do things. I just finished Sheryl Sandberg’s book which came out today and I think she perpetuates this view. She talks about leaning into a career by reaching for opportunities, taking a seat at the table, raising expectations, withstanding criticism and the like, but we are missing the conversation about finding success on your own terms.

 

The Facebook COO talks about an updated women’s movement and the ambition gap that is limiting women’s ability to advance in the workplace. But advance to what degree – the chief executive level? That is not the goal of millions of professional women. They are looking to be successful on their terms and to raise a family in a way that aligns with those terms. Her book is an interesting read and great for young women starting out and those who want to get to the top, but it really doesn’t speak to the other 99 percent of us not willing or able to approach work in the way Sheryl outlines.

 

Teleworking Helps Mothers “Lean In”

This story originally appeared in Psychology Today.

National Telework Week buzzed about, ironically, bans on telecommuting. Last week, Best Buy announced the end of its work-at-home program known as ROWE (results-only-work-environment), on the heels of Yahoo’s ban on remote work a week before.

Then snowstorms hit the midwest and east coast, closing schools and businesses, and people turned to — you guessed it — teleworking to stay productive and safe. When the snow melts, will the backlash against teleworking continue? The temptation for companies to mimic one another always exists, but this one should be resisted. Here’s why.

The Census reports that in 2010,13.4 million people worked at home at least one day per week. This represented 9.4% of all U.S. workers and was an increase of 4.2 million over the previous decade.

Leaning Together: A MomsRising Blog Carnival

This week, traditional and new media outlets are abuzz with news about Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s book, Lean In. For once, the focus of the media is on workplace policies and practices that directly impact women and families. So we’re taking the tiger by the tail!

In celebration of all women, and of Women’s History Month, MomsRising is bringing you this blog carnival — scroll down to see all the posts — where you can read the diverse perspectives of many people about contemporary women’s equality. Whether you like Sandberg’s new Lean In book (and concept) or despise it: It’s long past time to discuss women’s equality in the workplace and what still needs to be done. “Lean In,” “Lean Up,” “Lean Down,” or just plain “Lean,” it’s going to take all of us, leaning together, to build a better nation for women and families.

*So please take a moment to scroll down, check out the insightful, fact-filled blogs below, and enjoy! And then “Lean” with us as we take action!

Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer: ‘Lean In’ and Get Your Butt to the Office!

This blog post originally appeared in PunditMom.

Lean in! Take charge! No fear!

Out with flex-time! In with face time!

These are the messages two of the highest-profile working mothers in America are sending to the rest of us. If Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer, and Marissa Mayer, Yahoo!’s Chief Executive Officer, have their way, women in the workplace will remake themselves in their C-Suite images which, sadly, is looking like something from the 1980′s movie Working Girl. Their sentiments sound an awful lot like what I heard as a young journalist and then as a new attorney in a large law firm decades ago. Is this a case of “what’s old is new again?”

Welcome to the Past: Best Buy Embraces Last Century Management Practices

Best Buy Co, Inc. has gone backwards in time, following the footsteps of Yahoo! and demanding all hands on deck. We’re certain that other organizations are going to stumble backwards as well over the next few weeks. When we heard the news, we weren’t surprised; as new management came on board over the past few years – management that obviously favors managing schedules over managing performance – the stronghold of outdated thinking became the weed that choked the evolution of the most enviable, productive, attractive and globally-forward workforce of the future.

Lean In, Chin Up and Tune Out

I’ve been thinking a lot about women and our place in society the last couple of weeks. This is appropriate, as it is Women’s History Month and was kicked off at PBS with “Makers,” a three-hour documentary on the “second-wave” women’s movement.I sat down to watch it last weekend and was enthralled. I am old enough to remember all the events portrayed in the film, but was too young at the time to grasp the significance of the earlier events. And while I happily recognize that we’ve “come a long way,” I am terribly sad and frustrated that we’re not even close to achieving true equality.

If we were truly equal, the fuss over Marissa Mayers’ no-telecommuting directive at Yahoo! would have been focused on the protests of ALL affected employees, instead of just the mothers. And Sheryl Sandberg would not have needed to advise young women to “Lean In” to get ahead in the workplace.

Marissa Mayer Edict Reinforces Regressive Work Place Practices

This is an e-mail that MomsRising.org received at its member feedback “line”: feedback@momsrising.org.

So, once again Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer moves a pinky and the 24-hour news hounds start fanning the flames of discord among the working world’s haves and have-nots – pitting parents, non-parents, caretakers and others against one another. (For those who missed it, Mayer has issued a June 1 deadline for Yahoo! employees who work remotely from home to work from the office.)

Don’t be fooled into thinking this is about workplace communication, how one goes about finishing a task, face-time, new versus old way of performing work, and other similar issues — all of which have been studied for more than 30 years by such entities and efforts as the U.S. Department of Labor and the Sloan Foundation’s National Workplace Flexibility Initiative, to name just a few.

No, what this latest edict points out is what a woefully outmoded
workplace paradigm that establishes the direction of power in no uncertain terms.

Working Women Blues

This story originally appeared in the Carolyn Edgar blog.

There’s been a lot of talk in the media lately about women in the workplace. From Anne-Marie Slaughter’s complaining about not “having it all,” to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg exhorting women to “lean in” to their careers (translation: suck it up) and not let little things like babies disrupt their rise to the top, to Yahoo CEO Marissa Meyer boasting about her two-week maternity leave and cancelling the company’s telecommuting policy — op-ed pages and Facebook news feeds are full of people, mostly women, debating who has it right, wrong, or in-between.

There’s much about this “debate” that irritates me.

The Impact of Technology on Our Work and Family Lives

This blog was originally posted on October 2, 2012 on the Huffington Post

 

I’ve been thinking a lot about the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on our work and family lives and continue to be fascinated by this topic. The Pew Internet & American Life Project reported this September that, “on the eve of Apple’s unveiling of the iPhone 5, 45% of American adults own smartphones.” This reflects a 10% increase from May 2011. In addition, “smartphones are particularly popular with young adults and those living in relatively higher income households; 66% of those ages 18-29 own smartphones, and 68% of those living in households earning $75,000 also own them.”

Syndicate content

Copyright © 2012 MomsRising
Contact Us | Legal & Privacy | Subscribe | Unsubscribe