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The Custom-Fit Workplace
Check out this practical, inspirational guide for making the workplace more nimble, trust-based, and profitable. Packed with vivid stories of real people, The Custom-Fit Workplace is an indispensible handbook for managers, workers, and executives who want to break free of outdated, one-size-fits-all ways of working. Thoroughly grounded in research and cutting-edge designs, The Custom-Fit Workplace makes the case for today's workplace to buy-in - or risk falling behind.

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CustomFit Workplace blog

The CustomFit Workplace blog is part of the MomsRising.org Open, Flexible Work blog. It is a place where workers, managers, educators and Human Resources professionals can share their insights and questions. The views expressed in this blogs aren't necessarily representative of the CustomFitWorkplace.org initiative or of MomsRising.org policy positions. Interested in blogging? drop us a line

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Following Mom's Advice

My Mom chose college over a car and loved working for Eleanor Roosevelt in Washington after college. Though she was a very active stay-at-home mom after she married my Dad, my Mom always told me to have a career and a family, and I followed her advice. Another piece of advice from both my Mom and my Dad was to “do the best you can.”  Blessed (and, in some ways, cursed) with a body that doesn’t require much sleep to keep going, I took that advice to mean I should work as many hours as I could. In my first high-tech management job, I clocked 110 hours one week, and 70, 80, 90 hours many other weeks. 

Then I had my son, and I knew that the hours I spent at the office, I wasn’t spending with my precious little guy. I had my career and my family, and I wanted to do the best I could at both. I decided to see if I could get more effective at work rather than just piling on more hours.

I started each day by applying my Time Management Mantra:

Why Work Flexibility Works for Our Family: And Why We Want to Give Others the Opportunity

In honor of National Work & Family Month, two NC employers shared why the value family-friendly work place policies and why they want to give others that same opportunity.

 

Craig:  Ah, 2007.  I was 34 and pretty happy with my little world.  I was 10 years into my career, had married the love of my life, and shared incredible adventures with her, from biking famous Tour de France routes to getting married in Alaska.  What more could a guy ask for, right?  But, I still felt like we were missing something.  I lost my father to cancer when I was 17 years old.  He was 43.  Ever since, I’ve always thought that the best way to honor him, and to carry on his memory, would be to raise a family of my own and teach my kids everything he taught me.

 

Holding it together is overrated

I’m known as the oldest of seven, the product of overachievers, a hyper-competent “woman who always has answers and knows where she’s going,” the go-to girl–the one who always seems have it together.

And as I move deeper into the second half of my life, I’m questioning how this affects me–what is the price I pay for stepping into this personae? As a life balance evangelist, I’ve come a long way: I’ve let a lot of perfectionist tendencies drop, am less controlling than before and am a big advocate for the “good is good enough” message–but what would it look like for me to be MORE vulnerable? To be less prepared, less polished, more messy and human than I have ever been before?

It takes a lot of energy to told it together. My yoga teacher Jenn shared a story about a photographer who shot Salvador Dali over a stretch of five minutes (with time-lapsed breaks in between). Seeing Dali go back and forth between “DALI!” and a tired, slightly slumped over normal guy in a chair was fascinating. It showed how much energy it took for the artist to be on stage, in personae–to “hold it together.”

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